Archive for the ‘Software Architecture’ Category

Trace Analysis Patterns (Part 92)

Sunday, November 9th, 2014

Use cases are implemented in various components such as subsystems, processes, modules, and source code files. Most of the time with good tracing implementation we are able to see Use Case Trails: log messages corresponding to use case scenarios. For simple systems one log may fully correspond to just one use case, but for complex systems, especially distributed client-server ones, there may be several use case instances present simultaneously in one log. One way to disentangle them in the absence of UCID (Use Case ID) or some other grouping tag is to use Event Sequence Phase, the subject of the next pattern.

Master Traces may also correspond to use cases but they should ideally correspond to only one use case instance.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Crash Dump Analysis Patterns (Part 42m)

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Most if not all Wait Chain patterns are about waiting for some synchronization objects. Stack Traces of involved threads may point to Blocking and Top modules. In some situations we may consider a module (which functions were called) itself as a pseudo-synchronization object where a module (who called it) is waiting for it to return back (to become “signaled”). All this is problem and context dependent where some intermediate modules may be Pass Through or Well-Tested. When we see module inversion, such as in the case of callbacks we may provisionally suspect some kind of a deadlock and then investigate these threads in terms of synchronization objects or their corresponding source code:

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Trace Analysis Patterns (Part 63)

Friday, February 8th, 2013

Indexical Trace pattern describes an Inter-Correlation pattern variant when we have a trace that has messages of interest pointing to specific activity regions in another trace. The latter trace can be very huge, from another computer and split into many parts (Split Trace). This pattern is very helpful when the problem needs to be diagnosed in the large split trace but we don’t know when it happened. Then an index trace that may have recorded software execution account (for example, in the case of a broker-like architecture) and can point to the right trace fragment from the split trace.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Crash Dump Analysis Patterns (Part 182)

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012

This is a new pattern that we call Error Reporting Fault. It’s about the faults in error reporting infrastructure. The latter should be guarded against such faults and avoid recursion. Here is a summary example of such a pattern on Windows platforms that involve Windows Error Reporting (WER).

In a complete memory dump we notice thousands of WerFault.exe processes:

0: kd> !process 0 0
[...]
PROCESS fffffa8058010380
SessionId: 2  Cid: 488f0    Peb: 7efdf000  ParentCid: 27cb8
DirBase: 25640c000  ObjectTable: fffff8a06cd2ac50  HandleCount:  54.
Image: WerFault.exe

PROCESS fffffa805bbd5970
SessionId: 2  Cid: 4801c    Peb: 7efdf000  ParentCid: 27cb8
DirBase: 2c3f69000  ObjectTable: fffff8a040563af0  HandleCount:  54.
Image: WerFault.exe

PROCESS fffffa8078aec060
SessionId: 2  Cid: 3feac    Peb: 7efdf000  ParentCid: 488f0
DirBase: abd200000  ObjectTable: fffff8a07851a0a0  HandleCount:  59.
Image: WerFault.exe

PROCESS fffffa805bbe9a10
SessionId: 2  Cid: 3d8b8    Peb: 7efdf000  ParentCid: 4801c
DirBase: 261f91000  ObjectTable: fffff8a02d864d40  HandleCount:  56.
Image: WerFault.exe

PROCESS fffffa805bd29060
SessionId: 2  Cid: 1142c    Peb: 7efdf000  ParentCid: 3feac
DirBase: 429fb3000  ObjectTable: fffff8a0355b42e0  HandleCount:  58.
Image: WerFault.exe

PROCESS fffffa8053d853d0
SessionId: 2  Cid: 1fc4c    Peb: 7efdf000  ParentCid: 3d8b8
DirBase: 714371000  ObjectTable: fffff8a01cb6bba0  HandleCount:  58.
Image: WerFault.exe
[...]

Each process has only one thread running through WOW64 modules so we get its 32-bit stack trace:

0: kd> !process fffffa8075c21b30 ff
[...]
THREAD fffffa807c183b60 Cid 2d3c8.4334c Teb: 000000007efdb000 Win32Thread: fffff900c3f71010 WAIT: (UserRequest) UserMode Non-Alertable
[...]

0: kd> .load wow64exts

0: kd> .process /r /p fffffa8075c21b30
Implicit process is now fffffa80`75c21b30
Loading User Symbols
Loading Wow64 Symbols

0: kd> .thread /w fffffa807c183b60
Implicit thread is now fffffa80`7c183b60
x86 context set

0: kd:x86> k
*** Stack trace for last set context - .thread/.cxr resets it
ChildEBP          RetAddr
000bf474 77080bdd ntdll!ZwWaitForMultipleObjects+0x15
000bf510 76bb1a2c KERNELBASE!WaitForMultipleObjectsEx+0x100
000bf558 76bb4208 kernel32!WaitForMultipleObjectsExImplementation+0xe0
000bf574 76bd80a4 kernel32!WaitForMultipleObjects+0x18
000bf5e0 76bd7f63 kernel32!WerpReportFaultInternal+0x186
000bf5f4 76bd7858 kernel32!WerpReportFault+0x70
000bf604 76bd77d7 kernel32!BasepReportFault+0x20
000bf690 776674df kernel32!UnhandledExceptionFilter+0x1af
000bf698 776673bc ntdll!__RtlUserThreadStart+0x62
000bf6ac 77667261 ntdll!_EH4_CallFilterFunc+0x12
000bf6d4 7764b459 ntdll!_except_handler4+0x8e
000bf6f8 7764b42b ntdll!ExecuteHandler2+0x26
000bf71c 7764b3ce ntdll!ExecuteHandler+0x24
000bf7a8 77600133 ntdll!RtlDispatchException+0x127
000bf7b4 000bf7c0 ntdll!KiUserExceptionDispatcher+0xf
WARNING: Frame IP not in any known module. Following frames may be wrong.
000bfb00 77629ef2 0xbf7c0
[…]

We find exception processing and code on stack (return address belongs to stack range). This thread is waiting for another process and it is WerFault.exe too:

0: kd:x86> .effmach AMD64

0: kd> !process fffffa8075c21b30 ff
[...]
THREAD fffffa807c183b60 Cid 2d3c8.4334c Teb: 000000007efdb000 Win32Thread: fffff900c3f71010 WAIT: (UserRequest) UserMode Non-Alertable
fffffa80809c44e0 ProcessObject
[…]

0: kd> !process fffffa80809c44e0
PROCESS fffffa80809c44e0
SessionId: 2  Cid: 33844    Peb: 7efdf000  ParentCid: 2d3c8
DirBase: 9c53f0000  ObjectTable: fffff8a0423d4170  HandleCount: 978.
Image: WerFault.exe
[...]

We go back to our original WerFault process and in its PEB data we find it was called to report a fault from another process with PID 0n189240:

0: kd> !process fffffa8075c21b30 ff
[...]
CommandLine:  'C:\Windows\SysWOW64\WerFault.exe -u -p 189240 -s 3888′
[…]

And it’s WerFault.exe too:

0: kd> !process 0n189240
Searching for Process with Cid == 2e338

PROCESS fffffa8078b659e0
SessionId: 2  Cid: 2e338    Peb: 7efdf000  ParentCid: 47608
DirBase: 201796000  ObjectTable: fffff8a02e664380  HandleCount: 974.
Image: WerFault.exe
[...]

So we see a chain of WerFault.exe processes each processing a fault in the previous one. So there should be a first fault somewhere which we can find in stack trace collection (32-bit stack traces for this example) unless that exception stack trace was paged out due to insufficient memory occupied by WerFault.exe processes.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

WinDbg as a Practical Reversing Tool

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

I was very pleased to find out this book that uses WinDbg as OS reversing tool. Not only you learn a very important aspect of Windows internals related to crash and hang memory dump analysis (all crash processing starts from memory manager) but you also learn many WinDbg commands from practical reversing experiments. I was even more pleased to find the output of WinDbg command on the page 0, before even the table of contents.

What Makes It Page?: The Windows 7 (x64) Virtual Memory Manager

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Architecture of Process Memory Dump Capture Done Right

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

Sometimes I get requests to review application memory dump capture design. Of course, such requests usually come only when such designs don’t work or there are problems with loading saved crash dumps. The common blueprint of such architectures is a top level exception handler that use some API do capture and save process memory state. However, such designs forget why separate processed were introduced in the first place: to guard process memory space of different unrelated tasks (for related tasks there are threads). The data of the module (and its thread state) that does process memory capture may also be corrupt. The right design would be to show a message box with an information on how to use external process memory dumper such as Task Manager. If we need an automation then the right thing is to rely on WER features. Let separate processes do their work in separate spaces.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Forthcoming 2nd edition of Memory Dump Analysis Anthology, Volume 1

Sunday, April 15th, 2012

After 4 years in print this bestselling title needs an update to address minor changes, include extra examples and reference additional research published in Volumes 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

  • Title: Memory Dump Analysis Anthology, Volume 1
  • Author: Dmitry Vostokov
  • Publisher: OpenTask (Summer 2012)
  • Language: English
  • Product Dimensions: 22.86 x 15.24
  • Paperback: 800 pages
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-908043-35-1
  • Hardcover: 800 pages
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-908043-36-8

The cover for both paperback and hardcover titles will also have a matte finish. We used A Memory Window artwork for the back cover.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Analysis, Architectural, Design, Implementation and Usage Debugging Patterns (Part 1)

Saturday, January 7th, 2012

This is another tracing example of unified debugging patterns introduced previously.

- Analysis Patterns

Focus of Tracing

- Architectural Patterns

Debug Event Subscription / Notification

- Design Patterns

Shared Debug Event State

- Implementation Patterns

Shared Variable

- Usage Patterns

Saving a memory address obtained at a breakpoint event in a debugger pseudo-register for use at later breakpoint events

Debugging.tv published a case study for tracing window messages in WinDbg. There a pseudo-register is used to save a buffer address before GetMessage call and then to reuse it after the call. Please look at Event State Management slide on Frames episode 0×06 presentation. The full WinDbg log and the recording are available there too.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

MemoryOS (Part 1)

Friday, November 11th, 2011

This is a second long-term initiative for 2012 to design and develop memory-oriented operating system where memory is the foundation of the whole architecture from the ground up. More on this later as the announcement date and time memory pattern 11-11-11 11:11 is quickly approaching :-)

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Crossdisciplinary Memoretics as Interdisciplinary Science

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

Memoretics as a science of memory snapshots borrows many ideas from the following disciplines (the list is not exhaustive):

  • Troubleshooting and Debugging
  • Intelligence Analysis
  • Critical Thinking
  • Forensics
  • Linguistics
  • Archaeology
  • Psychoanalysis
  • History
  • Mathematics: Sets and Categories
  • Literary Criticism and Narratology

It also contributes many ideas back. The following diagram depicts such an interaction:

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Memory Dump Analysis Anthology, Volume 5 is available for download

Sunday, April 17th, 2011

I’m pleased to announce that MDAA, Volume 5 is available in PDF format:

www.dumpanalysis.org/Memory+Dump+Analysis+Anthology+Volume+5

It features:

- 25 new crash dump analysis patterns
- 11 new pattern interaction case studies (including software tracing)
- 16 new trace analysis patterns
- 7 structural memory patterns
- 4 modeling case studies for memory dump analysis patterns
- Discussion of 3 common analysis mistakes
- Malware analysis case study
- Computer independent architecture of crash analysis report service
- Expanded coverage of software narratology
- Metaphysical and theological implications of memory dump worldview
- More pictures of memory space and physicalist art
- Classification of memory visualization tools
- Memory visualization case studies
- Close reading of the stories of Sherlock Holmes: Dr. Watson’s observational patterns
- Fully cross-referenced with Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, and Volume 4

Its table of contents is available here:

www.dumpanalysis.org/MDAA/MDA-Anthology-V5-TOC.pdf

Paperback and hardcover versions should be available in a week or two. I also started working on Volume 6 that should be available in November-December.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Presentation from Webinar: Introduction to Pattern-Driven Software Problem Solving

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

The presentation materials from the webinar (25th of March, 2011) are available for download:

http://www.dumpanalysis.com/PDSPSI-materials

Thanks to everyone who registered and attended!

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

10 Common Mistakes in Memory Analysis (Part 10)

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

The last common mistake in this set is when an engineer doesn’t compare stack traces or other debugger output to normal reference stack traces. For example, a 3rd party service was hanging on a W2K8 server and a user memory dump was saved for offline analysis. The following thread was identified as blocked waiting for a response:

STACK_TEXT: 
0041f1bc 75a30816 ntdll_77e50000!ZwWaitForSingleObject+0x15
0041f228 76671184 KERNELBASE!WaitForSingleObjectEx+0x98
0041f240 76671138 kernel32!WaitForSingleObjectExImplementation+0x75
0041f254 75b17be6 kernel32!WaitForSingleObject+0x12
0041f2f8 75b18040 sechost!ScSendResponseReceiveControls+0xea
0041f3ac 75b18662 sechost!ScDispatcherLoop+0xc2
0041f3ec 01271bb4 sechost!StartServiceCtrlDispatcherW+0xb0
0041fa7c 01271dd6 ServiceA!WinMain+0×254
0041fb0c 76673677 ServiceA!__tmainCRTStartup+0×160
0041fb18 77e89d42 kernel32!BaseThreadInitThunk+0xe
0041fb58 77e89d15 ntdll_77e50000!__RtlUserThreadStart+0×70
0041fb70 00000000 ntdll_77e50000!_RtlUserThreadStart+0×1b

Unfortunately, this thread wasn’t recognized as a normal main service thread. Typical Internet search for ScSendResponseReceiveControls function points to a sample analysis log where we can find such thread stacks in the variety of other standard services:

THREAD fffffa8005362060  Cid 0a1c.0b68  Teb: 000007fffffde000 Win32Thread: 0000000000000000 WAIT: (UserRequest) UserMode Non-Alertable
    fffffa8004dc0a60  SynchronizationEvent
Not impersonating
DeviceMap                 fffff8a000008c10
Owning Process            fffffa800540e060       Image:         svchost.exe
Attached Process          N/A            Image:         N/A
Wait Start TickCount      37051          Ticks: 3239 (0:00:00:50.528)
Context Switch Count      13            
UserTime                  00:00:00.000
KernelTime                00:00:00.000
Win32 Start Address svchost!wmainCRTStartup (0x00000000ffa9246c)
Stack Init fffff88005abbdb0 Current fffff88005abb900
Base fffff88005abc000 Limit fffff88005ab6000 Call 0
Priority 9 BasePriority 8 UnusualBoost 0 ForegroundBoost 0 IoPriority 2 PagePriority 5
Child-SP          RetAddr           Call Site
fffff880`05abb940 fffff800`01a93992 nt!KiSwapContext+0x7a
fffff880`05abba80 fffff800`01a95cff nt!KiCommitThreadWait+0x1d2
fffff880`05abbb10 fffff800`01d871d2 nt!KeWaitForSingleObject+0x19f
fffff880`05abbbb0 fffff800`01a8b993 nt!NtWaitForSingleObject+0xb2
fffff880`05abbc20 00000000`7781fefa nt!KiSystemServiceCopyEnd+0x13 (TrapFrame @ fffff880`05abbc20)
00000000`001ffab8 000007fe`fda910ac ntdll!NtWaitForSingleObject+0xa
00000000`001ffac0 000007fe`ff4eaffb KERNELBASE!WaitForSingleObjectEx+0x79
00000000`001ffb60 000007fe`ff4e9d61 sechost!ScSendResponseReceiveControls+0×13b
00000000`001ffc50 000007fe`ff4e9c16 sechost!ScDispatcherLoop+0×121
00000000`001ffd60 00000000`ffa91d3a sechost!StartServiceCtrlDispatcherW+0×14e
00000000`001ffdb0 00000000`ffa9257a svchost!wmain+0×110
00000000`001ffde0 00000000`776cf56d svchost!ScCreateWellKnownSids+0×2fd
00000000`001ffe20 00000000`77803281 kernel32!BaseThreadInitThunk+0xd
00000000`001ffe50 00000000`00000000 ntdll!RtlUserThreadStart+0×1d

Also, studying OS architecture and deliberate practice in memory dump analysis helps in recognition of problem and normal structural and behavioral patterns.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Crash Dump Analysis Patterns (Part 131)

Monday, March 7th, 2011

In certain software behavior scenarios such as a memory leak when we see top modules calling OS API functions we might suspect them having defects. However, this might not be the case and these modules were used from Directing Module  keeping references or handles preventing top modules from freeing memory or releasing resources.

For example, a memory dump from a process had 2 growing heap segments and one of them had this recurrent stack trace saved in a user mode stack trace database:

38D2CE78: 02ba8 . 02ba8 [07] - busy (2b90), tail fill
Stack trace (38101) at 83e390:
7d6568be: ntdll!RtlAllocateHeapSlowly+0×00000041
7d62b846: ntdll!RtlAllocateHeap+0×00000E9F

337d0572: ModuleA!XHeapAlloc+0×00000115
[…]
338809e2: ModuleA!Execute+0×000002CD

488b3fc1: ModuleB!Execute+0×000000D3
679b8c64: ModuleC!ExecuteByHandle+0×00000074
[…]
67d241cb: ModuleD!Query+0×0000016B
67ba2ed4: ModuleE!Browse+0×000000E4
[…]
667122c6: ModuleF!Check+0×00000126
65e73826: ModuleG!Enum+0×00000406

[…]

Initially we suspected ModuleA but found a different recurrent stack trace corresponding to another growing segment:

40C81688: 000c8 . 00058 [07] - busy (40), tail fill
Stack trace (38136) at 83f6a4:
7d6568be: ntdll!RtlAllocateHeapSlowly+0×00000041
7d62b846: ntdll!RtlAllocateHeap+0×00000E9F
7c3416b3: msvcr71!_heap_alloc+0×000000E0
7c3416db: msvcr71!_nh_malloc+0×00000010

67745875: ModuleX!BufAllocate+0×00000015
6775085e: ModuleY!QueryAttribute+0×0000008E
[…]
677502b5: ModuleY!Query+0×00000015
67ba2f19: ModuleE!Browser+0×00000129
[…]
667122c6: ModuleF!Check+0×00000126
65e73826: ModuleG!Enum+0×00000406
[…]

From the common stack trace fragment (highlighted in blue) we transferred our investigation to ModuleE and indeed the similar software incident (as the latter trace) was found in our troubleshooting database.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Software Tracing Best Practices (Part 1)

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

In these post series we are going to discuss the best practices for software tracing implementation including appropriate patterns and their links to software trace analysis patterns. The first one is called Period Timestamp where the start and the end time (and the date if necessary) are recorded in the trace file. This helps in Inter-Correlation and News Value analysis between several different trace types. For example, in one scenario, we had WindowHistory and MessageHistory logs. We identified a problem in the former log as happening at this time:

Handle: 00010196 Class: "ClassA" Title: "TitleA"
   Captured at: 13:36:30:533
[…]

However, when we looked at the latter trace to search for specific window messages posted or sent before that time we saw that the recording started later than the former event:

Start time: 13:36:35:830

Period timestamps are necessary to distinguish Incomplete History from Truncated Trace where in the former case the absence of expected trace message is due to some problem.

From a unified debugging patterns perspective we have this sequence fragment:

Implementation Patterns: Period Timestamp

Usage Patterns: Trace Simultaneously

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Debugging in 2021: Trends for the Next Decade (Part 1)

Friday, December 17th, 2010

As the new decade is approaching (2011-2020) we would like to make a few previews and predictions:

- Increased complexity of software will bring more methods from biological, social sciences and humanities in addition to existing methods of automated debugging and computer science techniques

- Focus on first fault software problem solving (when aspect)

- Focus on pattern-driven software problem solving (how aspect)

- Fusion of debugging and malware analysis into a unified structural and behavioral pattern framework

- Visual debugging, memory and software trace visualization techniques

- Software maintenance certification

- Focus on domain-driven troubleshooting and debugging tools as a service (debugware TaaS)

- Focus on security issues related to memory dumps and software traces

- New scripting languages and programming language extensions for debugging

- The maturation of the science of memory snapshots and software traces (memoretics)

Imagining is not not limited to the above and more to come and explain in the forthcoming parts.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Analysis, Architectural, Design, Implementation and Usage Debugging Patterns (Part 0)

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

We now start unifying software behavior analysis patterns with debugging architecture, design, implementation and usage. This is analogous to software construction where a problem analysis leads to various software engineering phases. The important difference here is the addition of debugging usage patterns. Let’s look at an example (we discuss suggested patterns later):

- Analysis Patterns

Shared Buffer Overwrite

- Architectural Patterns

Debug Event Subscription / Notification

- Design Patterns

Punctuated Execution

- Implementation Patterns

Breakpoint (software and hardware)

- Usage Patterns

Kernel vs. user space breakpoints

To differentiate this systematic approach from the various published ad hoc debugging patterns we call it Unified Debugging Pattern Language. ADI parts can also correspond to various DebugWare patterns where we provide a mapping later.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

DebugWare Patterns (Part 13)

Thursday, November 25th, 2010

Our next pattern is called System Description Snapshot. The tool or component compiles the list of system properties and collections, like hardware resources, selected file names from file systems, registry and other configuration information. Two or several snapshots can be compared either visually or automatically to highlight state differences that help in troubleshooting, debugging and problem resolution. Examples of such tools include:

Microsoft Windows System State Analyzer

Citrix Xnapshot

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Forthcoming Memory Dump Analysis Anthology, Volume 5

Friday, November 12th, 2010

Five volumes of cross-disciplinary Anthology (dubbed by the author “The Summa Memorianica”) lay the foundation of the scientific discipline of Memoretics (study of computer memory snapshots and their evolution in time) that is also called Memory Dump and Software Trace Analysis.ca

The 5th volume contains revised, edited, cross-referenced, and thematically organized selected DumpAnalysis.org blog posts about crash dump, software trace analysis and debugging written in February 2010 - October 2010 for software engineers developing and maintaining products on Windows platforms, quality assurance engineers testing software on Windows platforms, technical support and escalation engineers dealing with complex software issues, and security researchers, malware analysts and reverse engineers. The fifth volume features:

- 25 new crash dump analysis patterns
- 11 new pattern interaction case studies (including software tracing)
- 16 new trace analysis patterns
- 7 structural memory patterns
- 4 modeling case studies for memory dump analysis patterns
- Discussion of 3 common analysis mistakes
- Malware analysis case study
- Computer independent architecture of crash analysis report service
- Expanded coverage of software narratology
- Metaphysical and theological implications of memory dump worldview
- More pictures of memory space and physicalist art
- Classification of memory visualization tools
- Memory visualization case studies
- Close reading of the stories of Sherlock Holmes: Dr. Watson’s observational patterns
- Fully cross-referenced with Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, and Volume 4

Product information:

  • Title: Memory Dump Analysis Anthology, Volume 5
  • Author: Dmitry Vostokov
  • Language: English
  • Product Dimensions: 22.86 x 15.24
  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Opentask (10 December 2010)
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-906717-96-4
  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Opentask (10 December 2010)
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-906717-97-1

Back cover features memory space art image Hot Computation: Memory on Fire.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -

Memory Dump Analysis Anthology, Volume 4 is available for download

Saturday, November 6th, 2010

I’m pleased to announce that MDAA, Volume 4 is available in PDF format:

www.dumpanalysis.org/Memory+Dump+Analysis+Anthology+Volume+4

It features:

- 15 new crash dump analysis patterns
- 13 new pattern interaction case studies
- 10 new trace analysis patterns
- 6 new Debugware patterns and case study
- Workaround patterns
- Updated checklist
- Fully cross-referenced with Volume 1, Volume 2 and Volume 3
- Memory visualization tutorials
- Memory space art

Its table of contents is available here:

http://www.dumpanalysis.org/MDAA/MDA-Anthology-V4-TOC.pdf

Paperback and hardcover versions should be available in a week or two. I also started working on Volume 5 that should be available in December.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ DumpAnalysis.org + TraceAnalysis.org -