Archive for the ‘Mathematical Modeling’ Category

Facets of Systems Science

Monday, September 17th, 2012

If you liked An Introduction to General Systems Thinking book then you really need this comprehensive introduction which is more formal. Don’t be overwhelmed by the number of pages, you only need to read part 1, the first 218 pages as the rest is a collection of articles you can read selectively later on. For me one of the great features was the coverage of systems literature including some mathematical treatment books (including category theory in addition to famous Rosen’s books such as Anticipatory Systems). I also liked the discussion of critics of general systems theory that points to the fact that it should be called general systems-theory not general-systems theory. Highly recommended.

Facets of Systems Science (IFSR International Series on Systems Science and Engineering)

- Dmitry Vostokov @ LiterateScientist.com -

An Introduction to General Systems Thinking

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

This book I bought more than 5 years ago after I recognized that systems approach was needed for memory dump analysis. However, I read it only recently while preparing to talk on systemic software diagnostics. While reading I realized that I already applied some systems theory ideas, for example, about isomorphism of disciplines as systems (which I named as metaphorical bijection): from literary narratology to software narratology and from that to network trace analysis. So if you are interested in systems either computer software ones or human organizational then I would greatly recommend this book as an introduction. The recommended literature in exercises is also useful.

An Introduction to General Systems Thinking (Silver Anniversary Edition)

- Dmitry Vostokov @ LiterateScientist.com -

The CRC Encyclopedia of Mathematics

Thursday, November 12th, 2009

The CRC Encyclopedia of Mathematics, Third Edition - 3 Volume Set

Buy from Amazon

I spotted this book on Amazon US and was thrilled to have the new edition in 3 volumes for easy handling when reading. I also have the previous edition that is even featured on my own book cover (the picture of my previous library book arrangement, the book is highlighted in white rectangle in the lower right corner):

This is a unique volume that sits between The Princeton Companion to Mathematics (that I’m also reading now) and Encyclopedic Dictionary of Mathematics: The Mathematical Society of Japan (that I also own). In fact after reading 3 volumes from cover to cover I can start with 2 volumes of EDM. There is also Springer Encyclopaedia of Mathematics in 11 volumes with various additional supplement volumes that I plan to own as well and it looks to me on the same level as EDM.

After searching for the best price I ordered a copy from Amazon DE and after my purchase in just a few days the price was up by 50%! I can only explain this that more people tried to purchase after I used twitter to announce this encyclopedia (there were 5 copies available on Amazon DE and in just 2 days only 1 left) or there was a mistake in price.

3 volumes arrived and I immediately started reading them, a few pages from each volume every day using mod 3 reading technique, for example, Wed - Vol I, Thu - Vol II, Fri - Vol III, Mon - Vol I, an so on. I prefer paper books for bulk reading instead of electronic version (in this case corresponding website) although if I’m interested in a specific article or a keyword I go to Wolfram MathWorld website to get the latest update and citations. These paperback volumes are just for day-to-day scheduled reading to get ideas and general mathematical education. This is why I don’t need an Index. For example, just after reading the first pages I got the idea of cubic (qubic) memory representation.

I usually put reviews on Amazon after I finish a book from cover to cover but in this case the review would be waiting for at least a year so I write it now based on my first impressions. After some time I plan to update it.

- Dmitry Vostokov @ LiterateScientist.com -